Current Exhibit:

"NATURAL CONNECTION" Denise Drummond and Joseph Grice

The Tri-County Arts Council presents “A Natural Connection” featuring landscapes and wildlife art by Denise Drummond and Joseph Grice. May 11th through June 15th in the Peg Bothner Gallery at the Tri-County Arts Council, 110 West State Street in Olean, NY. Public reception Saturday May 18th from 5:30-7:30PM.

Bradford Pennsylvania artist Denise Drummond began her love affair with nature at an early age while growing up in the woodlands of Northwestern Pennsylvania. “My artwork is an attempt to capture and hold the love I have for nature and wild places, especially our national parks and wilderness areas. I am intrigued and drawn in by every twig on the branches of trees. Most of my drawings and paintings show all of that detail… from the leaves on trees to the ferns on the forest floor.”, says Denise Drummond.

Joseph Grice is a wildlife illustrator currently working in Jamestown, NY. After graduating with his BFA from SUNY Fredonia in 2010, he taught art at Infinity Visual & Performing Arts in Jamestown, and at Holt School of Fine Art in Charlotte, NC. “Birds are like living, breathing works of art; their colors and patterns dance through the skies and treetops, making our world a more beautiful place to live. They symbolize hope, showing us that we have the strength to overcome adversity. They remind us to be fierce, elegant, communal and kind, to be unapologetically ourselves. My bird portraits not only speak to the beauty of the creatures that we share our planet with, but also remind us of the traits within ourselves that make us uniquely human.”

This is a must-see show for anyone who loves the great outdoors!

The Tri-County Arts Council presents “A Natural Connection” featuring landscapes and wildlife art by Denise Drummond and Joseph Grice. May 11th through June 15th in the Peg Bothner Gallery at the Tri-County Arts Council, 110 West State Street in Olean, NY. Public reception Saturday May 18th from 5:30-7:30PM.

Bradford Pennsylvania artist Denise Drummond began her love affair with nature at an early age while growing up in the woodlands of Northwestern Pennsylvania. “My artwork is an attempt to capture and hold the love I have for nature and wild places, especially our national parks and wilderness areas. I am intrigued and drawn in by every twig on the branches of trees. Most of my drawings and paintings show all of that detail… from the leaves on trees to the ferns on the forest floor.”, says Denise Drummond.

Joseph Grice is a wildlife illustrator currently working in Jamestown, NY. After graduating with his BFA from SUNY Fredonia in 2010, he taught art at Infinity Visual & Performing Arts in Jamestown, and at Holt School of Fine Art in Charlotte, NC. “Birds are like living, breathing works of art; their colors and patterns dance through the skies and treetops, making our world a more beautiful place to live. They symbolize hope, showing us that we have the strength to overcome adversity. They remind us to be fierce, elegant, communal and kind, to be unapologetically ourselves. My bird portraits not only speak to the beauty of the creatures that we share our planet with, but also remind us of the traits within ourselves that make us uniquely human.”

This is a must-see show for anyone who loves the great outdoors!

Past Exhibits:

"A Little Something..." Members Small Works Show 2023

“A Little Something Small,” the fourth annual juried small works show, which is taking place now in the Peg Bothner Gallery, located at 110 W. State St. in Olean. From now until Jan. 13, the public is invited to view more than 175 pieces of artwork submitted by over 65 different artists from Allegany, Cattaraugus, and Chautauqua counties.

Now in its fourth year, the TCAC’s small works show features more artists and pieces than ever before, and according to Sean Huntington, exhibition coordinator, this year’s selection is incredible. “Every year, this has grown,” he said. “In the first year, we had approximately 100 pieces, and in the second year, we had 130, last year, we had 150. This year, we have 176 pieces, and the quality is amazing—these artists just keep topping themselves!”

Like last year, the TCAC is giving out awards in two categories: Amateur and Professional. Colin Shaffer, Managing Director of Galleries for JCC, will select winners for the following awards: Best in Show, Best Professional, Honorable Mention Professional, Best Amateur, and Honorable Mention Amateur. Each award winner will receive a cash prize and a year’s Artisan Membership, which allows the artist the opportunity to sell in the TCAC’s Artisan Market. The public has a chance to vote for their favorite in the “People’s Choice” award, voting until December 2nd.

Artwork ranges from watercolor, gouache, oil painting, photography pottery, jewelry, sculpture, stained glass, and more. Each participating artist submitted one to three pieces of artwork under 12 inches by 12 inches, and some have already sold out. This year’s participating artists include Sannie Adams, Stephanie Baker, John Balacki, Karen Barber, Bonnie Bennett, Jessica Ellen Boice, Rose Brawn, Judson Brown, Victoria Brown, Christopher Capozzi, Kate Caswell, Lisa Conn Conklin, John Crandall, Wanda Dean, Laurie Donner, Debra Eck, Corey Fecteau, Karen Fitzpatrick, Ruth Flood, Barbara Fox, Pat Shannon Gay, Sherri Geary, Stephanie Goodwin, Ed Green, Marshall Green, Theresa Heinz, Amanda Hulbert, Jodie Hooker, Noah Howard, Sean Huntington, Daniel Jordan, Peter Jones, Bonnie Leigh, Melissa Locke, Myriam Mayshark, Keith McKale, Lilly Milliman, Bradley Mitchell, Stephanie Mitchell, Kristen Muench, Jean Nevinger, Violet Nolder, Nancy Pascarella, Sarah Phillips, Jo Jo Pingitove, Eva Potter, Daryl Reding, Megan Saboda, Mathew Schmidt, Jessie Lampack Slattery, Carol Smith, Geraldine Nash Smith, Tiffany Smith, Debbie Stillson-Travis, John Stromberg, Darlene Subulski, Tara Walker, Deb Weatherell, Michael Weishan, Eileen Weishan, Jennifer Widger, Mikel Wintermantel, Jennifer Wolbert, Abby Zickefoose, and Glenn Zweygart.

While some pieces have already sold, over 175 works are still on display in the Peg Bothner Gallery of the TCAC from now until January 13th, which is perfect timing for those who are planning to gift their piece! Every purchase supports the TCAC, as well as local artists who have invested their time and talent in creating these one-of-a-kind pieces. “This show is a wonderful way for local artists to introduce themselves to new collectors,” said Huntington. “We have an impressive community of artists in this area.”

“A Little Something Small,” the fourth annual juried small works show, which is taking place now in the Peg Bothner Gallery, located at 110 W. State St. in Olean. From now until Jan. 13, the public is invited to view more than 175 pieces of artwork submitted by over 65 different artists from Allegany, Cattaraugus, and Chautauqua counties.

Now in its fourth year, the TCAC’s small works show features more artists and pieces than ever before, and according to Sean Huntington, exhibition coordinator, this year’s selection is incredible. “Every year, this has grown,” he said. “In the first year, we had approximately 100 pieces, and in the second year, we had 130, last year, we had 150. This year, we have 176 pieces, and the quality is amazing—these artists just keep topping themselves!”

Like last year, the TCAC is giving out awards in two categories: Amateur and Professional. Colin Shaffer, Managing Director of Galleries for JCC, will select winners for the following awards: Best in Show, Best Professional, Honorable Mention Professional, Best Amateur, and Honorable Mention Amateur. Each award winner will receive a cash prize and a year’s Artisan Membership, which allows the artist the opportunity to sell in the TCAC’s Artisan Market. The public has a chance to vote for their favorite in the “People’s Choice” award, voting until December 2nd.

Artwork ranges from watercolor, gouache, oil painting, photography pottery, jewelry, sculpture, stained glass, and more. Each participating artist submitted one to three pieces of artwork under 12 inches by 12 inches, and some have already sold out. This year’s participating artists include Sannie Adams, Stephanie Baker, John Balacki, Karen Barber, Bonnie Bennett, Jessica Ellen Boice, Rose Brawn, Judson Brown, Victoria Brown, Christopher Capozzi, Kate Caswell, Lisa Conn Conklin, John Crandall, Wanda Dean, Laurie Donner, Debra Eck, Corey Fecteau, Karen Fitzpatrick, Ruth Flood, Barbara Fox, Pat Shannon Gay, Sherri Geary, Stephanie Goodwin, Ed Green, Marshall Green, Theresa Heinz, Amanda Hulbert, Jodie Hooker, Noah Howard, Sean Huntington, Daniel Jordan, Peter Jones, Bonnie Leigh, Melissa Locke, Myriam Mayshark, Keith McKale, Lilly Milliman, Bradley Mitchell, Stephanie Mitchell, Kristen Muench, Jean Nevinger, Violet Nolder, Nancy Pascarella, Sarah Phillips, Jo Jo Pingitove, Eva Potter, Daryl Reding, Megan Saboda, Mathew Schmidt, Jessie Lampack Slattery, Carol Smith, Geraldine Nash Smith, Tiffany Smith, Debbie Stillson-Travis, John Stromberg, Darlene Subulski, Tara Walker, Deb Weatherell, Michael Weishan, Eileen Weishan, Jennifer Widger, Mikel Wintermantel, Jennifer Wolbert, Abby Zickefoose, and Glenn Zweygart.

While some pieces have already sold, over 175 works are still on display in the Peg Bothner Gallery of the TCAC from now until January 13th, which is perfect timing for those who are planning to gift their piece! Every purchase supports the TCAC, as well as local artists who have invested their time and talent in creating these one-of-a-kind pieces. “This show is a wonderful way for local artists to introduce themselves to new collectors,” said Huntington. “We have an impressive community of artists in this area.”

Southern Tier Biennial (STB) A Regional Survey of Contemporary Art

Don’t miss this prestigious art show! 

Since 2005, the Southern Tier Biennial has given rural artists the opportunity to take part in a juried professional art competition and gallery show. Every two years, artists from across New York State’s Southern Tier region submit their work to be juried by a new panel of top art professionals. The result is a stunning array of work showing the vitality of the visual arts in rural New York! 

September 16th – November 4, 2023
Reception and awards ceremony Saturday, September 16th,  3-6 pm

Peg Bothner Gallery At the Tri-County Arts Council~110 West State St, Olean NY

Open Tues-Fri 12-6, Sat 12-5 

This year 51 works of art from 36 artists were chosen from the 157 artists and over 400 pieces entered!

Don’t miss this prestigious art show! 

Since 2005, the Southern Tier Biennial has given rural artists the opportunity to take part in a juried professional art competition and gallery show. Every two years, artists from across New York State’s Southern Tier region submit their work to be juried by a new panel of top art professionals. The result is a stunning array of work showing the vitality of the visual arts in rural New York! 

September 16th – November 4, 2023
Reception and awards ceremony Saturday, September 16th, 3-6 pm

Peg Bothner Gallery At the Tri-County Arts Council~110 West State St, Olean NY.  Open Tues-Fri 12-6, Sat 12-5 

This year 51 works of art from 36 artists were chosen from the 157 artists and over 400 pieces entered!

 

Congratulations to the 2023 STB artists!

Anne Auld, Barbara Behrmann, Tammy Renée Brackett, Chloe Bryant, Eva Capobianco, Frank Chang, Paul Cwikla, Victoria Eckley-Brown, Nancy Nixon Ensign, Jodie Estes, Hans Gindlesberger, Lindsey Glover, Ed Green, Marshall Green, Aaron Harrison, Katelyn Heins, David Higgins, Andrea Kastner, Jimmy Keller, Madison LaVallee, Barbara Mink, Gabe Morton-Cook, Timothy Pauszek, Brian Payne, Jim Root, Michelle Schleider, Laura Jaen Smith, Joe Sorci, Cesilia Tucker, Kari Varner, Jane Walker, Chris Walters, Anna Warfield, Rob Whitcomb, Todd Wolfe, and Glenn Zweygardt.

For more information: www.southerntierbiennial.com or call 716-372-7455

The STB is presented by the Tri-County Arts Council and the Cattaraugus Regional Community Foundation, made possible by an endowment from the estate of F. Donald Kenney.

"THE REAL ETHEREAL WORLD" Collages by Sara Baker Michalak

The Tri-County Arts Council is pleased to present “The Real Ethereal World”,
collages by Sara Baker Michalak.  July 15 – August 26 2023

Artist Statement:

My collage works reflect a view of the natural world’s beauty and its ephemerality: the tangible that clearly defines nature’s forms, and the fluid forces that animate it. I most often begin with recognizable imagery that references land/water/atmosphere, what’s observable in the nature. What I feel in it guides the work from there – the layered complexity and interdependence of all that makes the environment whole and fluid; nature’s cyclical processes of birth, growth, decline and return; planetary life and its vast time scales; what’s happening at the interfaces between the natural and built environments. The abstractions that emerge in much of my work is a blending of these—the real ethereal world.

I create with imagery that I photograph, paint and draw on substrates of varying translucency, incorporating found papers and ephemera. These become preliminary collages that I revise with cutting and re-collaging, for components in larger pieces. The final works are developed on canvas or panel that I’ve textured with paint or acrylic gel. As depth in material and texture is developed, I remove selected areas (by sanding, scratching, rubbing, washing), exposing aspects of earlier layers and substrate textures. The resulting works suggest the material reality I’m after.

Sara holds a BFA from Rochester Institute of Technology’s School of American Crafts and an MA in Interdisciplinary Studies (Humanities/Geoscience) from SUNY Fredonia She has exhibited her artworks widely, including at the American Craft Museum in New York City; the Burchfield Penny and Albright Knox galleries in Buffalo; the International Small Art Show in Atlanta, Georgia; and Cleveland Museum of Art. Sara currently serves on the Boards for the Chautauqua Crafts Alliance and North Shore Arts Alliance. Her studio sits on the banks of the Canadaway Creek, a Lake Erie tributary near Fredonia, NY, where she also propagates native wildflowers and is engaged with habitat protection.

"HAUDENOSAUNEE" ART OF THE NOW

This group show celebrates the unique traditions and experiences of each Artist in Resident (AiR) at the Seneca Iroquois National Museum.  From beadworking and basket making to sewing and painting, the pieces showcase cultural survival, living heritage, and individuals thriving in their creativity. Artists live and work in both Allegany and Cattaraugus territories. These artists make regalia for family and friends. They regularly sell at local fairs and artist markets. They are community teachers and experts at their craft. Many have exhibited at Seneca Iroquois National Museum, Iroquois Museum/Howes Cave, and Ganondagan. A few works have found a  home in the National Museum of the American Indian’s permanent collection. 

Featured Artists: 
-(Allegany) Penny Minner, Alicia Sanford, Kristina Tome, and Leeora Saraphine White. 

-(Cattaraugus) Samantha Jacobs, Lorinda John, Bernadette Scott, Antoinette “Toni” Scott.

"CATCHING FIRE" Collaborative from Scott Creek Fire-Place

The show showcases the process, pottery, and people from the Scott Creek Fire-Place, in Sheridan, NY.  The kiln site is nestled among grape vineyards, on an old horse pasture, with a creek flowing through its backdrop.  Here Marv Bjurlin gathers woodfire potters around the hearths of six kilns at this privately owned site. Potters find their intrigue with clay, wood, and fire in a communal atmosphere of work and play.  

Potters included: Marvin Bjurlin, Lisa Eppolito, Elliott Hutton, Ann Janik, Ted Lee, Caelin McDaniels, Marcia Merrins, Joe Mooseman, Anne Mormile, Sherry Nugent, Kevin Raymond, Alberto Rey, Jessie Simmons, Jake Swanson, and Sarah Zielonka.

Peter Midgley: "Shifting Focus"

 “I first came to art through pottery, which hooked me in 1980 with my first ceramics class.  Pottery is seemingly so simple – just mix, Earth, water, and fire – yet it is infinitely complex.  My fascination with this medium pulled me through a BA degree from the University of Dallas and then an MFA degree from Ohio University.  I have been working in clay ever since.

In 1995, Alfred State College gave me the opportunity to teach, and I discovered an affinity for that.  I am still teaching Art and Art History there, and I still (mostly) enjoy it.  I started making Ray Guns about 8 years ago, for the sheer fun of it.  I have always loved Science Fiction, and I have always collected small, cool, retro objects.  Suddenly these things connected.  The process is refreshing and immediate, without the need to trust a kiln for firing at the end.
 
The Encaustic images are very recent, they sprang up suddenly during the recent pandemic. I suppose teaching Art History for all those years finally opened me up to some new possibilities.  The hot wax flows and mixes colors in a semi-controlled way, which to me is reminiscent of ceramic glazes during a firing. The major difference is that it happens right in front of you, and it can be controlled in real time.  The color interactions are expressive and seem limitless, and the process is both demanding and a genuine pleasure.  Regularly switching from pottery to teaching to Steam Punk to expressive color is not always smooth, but this shifting of focus seems to be working, for now.”

"A LITTLE SOMETHING..." Members small works show

November 12th - January 14th

 

The Tri-County Arts Council proudly presents the third annual “A Little Something” Small Works Members Show!

 
We started this event to give an opportunity for all our region’s artists to show their work here in the stunning Peg Bothner Gallery. What began as 40 pieces has
grown into 150, with artwork that continues to impress us more each year. From
painting to pottery, fiber to photography, this show is a beautiful sampling of
this region’s artistic talent.

 

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE FULL LIST OF ARTISTS

“KNOTS, WEBS, AND ENTANGLEMENTS” by Carla Stetson
September 30thth – October 29th

Carla is the 2021 Southern Tier Biennial Exhibition Best in Show Winner

Carla Stetson is a visual artist currently living and working in a barn built in 1840 that she converted into her studio and home on four acres near Ithaca, New York.  It is also home to Sky Barn Apiaries.  Her work explores the tangled interrelationships between the wild and human in mixed media drawings, sculptures, and installations.

Stetson received a bachelor’s in fine arts degree in sculpture from the Kansas City Art Institute and Master of Fine Arts degree from Vermont College.  She recently retired as an Associate professor of Art at Ithaca College in New York and now works full time in her studio.   Previously, she lived in Duluth, Minnesota, where she is best known for public sculpture, especially the Clayton Jackson McGhie Memorial, the first large scale memorial to victims of lynching in the United States.

Stetson’s residency awards include Draw International in France; McColl Center for the Arts in Charlotte, North Carolina; Saltonstall Foundation in New York; and the Jentel Foundation in Wyoming.  She has received fellowships and grants from the Puffin Foundation, Intermedia Arts, Arrowhead Regional Arts Council, the Minnesota State Arts Board, and Ithaca College.  Her work is included in several collections, including the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, the Tweed Museum of Art in Duluth, Minnesota, the City of Duluth, and Carolinas Health Care in Charlotte, North Carolina, the University of Minnesota, and the St. Louis County Historical Association. 

"COLOURED POTS" IZINKAMBA AMAKALADI

by Fileve Tlaloc

Coloured Pots (Izinkamba kwamaKhaladi) is an example of pottery inspired by izinkamba style of the amaZulu ethnic group, which in part, makes up my maternal line.  By transposing family photgraphs and snippets of scholarly work based on race onto these pots, the work explores the history, culture, and identity of creole people in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa who are known as “Coloureds.”  This work connects the past and the present by exploring family photos of individuals and communities that played a role in the creation of the creole ethnic group.  Through the combination of clay, photography, and scholarly research I unpack notions of race, purity, science, and law in relation to creole individuals and communities who are combinations of indigenous Africans, settler Europeans, and immigrant Asians.  Coloured Pots Izinkamba amaKaladi contributes to artistic and cultural diversity by showing the exchanges and intimate relationships across cultural and geographical borders.  Although the focal point builds upon my personal heritage living abroad, and my intentional, personal maintenance of my familial relationships in South Africa, the subject matter and my local experience, opens a forum for discussion of similar instances of creolization in America as well as engaging timely issues of privacy, policy, and agency.

"ZWEYGARDT SCULPTURE" by Glenn Zweygardt

On exhibit July 8th - August 13th 2022

As an artist, Glenn Zweygardt states, “Finding one’s place in a relationship with nature is the theme of my sculpture. While working with materials such as metal and stone, a relationship between nature and myself is formed. Further, I want to tell stories and comment on my collective life experience and my perception of a collective consciousness. Hopefully, these ideas and expressions will enter into human consciousness and the fourth dimension.”

 The works of Glenn Zweygardt are simultaneously ancient and contemporary. With his use of diverse materials – cast bronze, glass, iron, marble, stainless steel, stone, and granite – he creates complex media sculptures that exemplify a master of the three-dimensional form. Zweygardt’s work will be on displayed not only in the Gallery but on the TCAC sidewalk, as we are adding one of Zweygardt’s sculptures with the Tri County Art Council logo. 

 Zweygardt possesses an uncanny ability to fuse dissimilar elements and concepts, natural occurring and fabricated forms, into structures that command the attention if the observer. This interaction of artist, nature and technology has a unifying effect on the observer’s imagery and psyche.

Duplication and relationship are a recurring theme found throughout Zweygardt’s work. A carefully chosen stone, cast, and duplicated in bronze, aluminum or steel becomes the basis of definite architectural themes that manifest in a range of sizes.

Zweygardt’s mastery of the building process along with his ability to create enormous works of art from materials of tremendous mass has gained him international recognition and membership to the Berman Group, a cooperative of sculptors whose collective work spans virtually the entire spectrum of possibilities of “traditional” modernist sculpture.

Kansas born; Zweygardt earned the BFA degree from Wichita State in 1967. He received the MFA from the Maryland Institute of Art in 1969 and is an emeritus Professor of Sculpture at the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. Zweygardt works independently in his immense workshop in Alfred Station, New York. Here his work continues to evolve-varied shapes and rich surfaces, transparent and dense forms, concept, and technical relationships, personal and collective perceptions-into fine art of eminent legacy.

“Restless Creativity”

Debra Eck

On Exhibit May 27th through July 2nd

Recpetion on Saturday June 25th 5:30-7:30pm

“Like many artists today my work is not defined by any single material. I move restlessly between mediums, letting each idea find its own expression. This exhibition is a survey of works both old and new, that showcases the variety of materials and techniques used in my studio practice and highlights the common themes that run through them all.”

Debra Eck is a book and installation artist who works primarily with thread, text and
fibers. Her work is in public and private collections, both here and in Europe. Originally from Essex in the UK, she has lived and worked in Western New York for
over 30 years. Eck received a BFA in painting from the University at Buffalo, and an
MA in Visual Culture from the University of Northumbria in Newcastle (UK). After many years of working as a college instructor at Jamestown Community
college and SUNY Fredonia, Eck has chosen to focus on teaching adults in
community settings. She is currently the director of the Pearl City Clay House
program at Infinity Visual and Performing Arts in Jamestown, and is a member of
many local arts organizations, including TCAC where she sits on the board.

“Birds”

Samila Sosic

On Exhibit from April 16th through May 20th

The “BIRDS” series comes to life through observation and documentation of hummingbird flying patterns. The driving force behind this series is a fascination of non-verbal communication between flying partners. My intention is to embrace and present their graceful moves and striking beauty through elements of color, texture, and movements. By using bracketing photo references and transferring them into paintings, the hummingbirds started to perform their dances on my canvases. I left the curiosity of the viewer’s eyes to create their own patterns and find the personal dance in each of my “BIRDS”.

Samila Sosic is a Bosnian native, who moved to New York City in 1992 after graduating with a BS in Architecture from the University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. In 2005, she enrolled in the Interdisciplinary Arts program at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford. After obtaining a BA degree in 2011, she continued her art education at the Academy of Art in San Francisco. In 2014, Sosic received her MFA in Painting and Drawing from the Academy of Art and secured the position of Adjunct Professor at University of Pittsburgh at Bradford.

For more information on Samila Sosic, visit her website at: http://www.samilasfineart.org/

"Silent Beings"

Amanda Parry Oglesbee

Was on Exhibit Febuary 18th through April 2nd

The larger paintings in this show were made recently and are portraits of trees that I have found walking or driving that call to me.  Primary elements in the paintings are tree trunks, the surrounding atmosphere, and their interior essence.  Scars of lost limbs and forms created through decay and adaptation reveal their unique histories made over very long lives.  Smooth bark displays shadows from the exterior world while rough bark alludes to inner growth and struggle.  Some exist in a golden atmosphere suggesting the infinite while others appear to be posed in a portrait studio or seen against the sky.

The inspiration for the larger paintings came from the making of smaller ones such as those selected here.  Some studies were made working outside directly with the tree(s) and some were imagined.  It was through these pieces that I found a way to express something of what trees and life means to me.

I am moved by the beauty and courage of all things that grow on earth, especially trees.  As I paint trees they become portraits of beings compelled to grow, nurture and survive.  Some of my paintings are made directly observing nature.  My work is sometimes influenced by historical art and other times built entirely from my imagination allowing the piece to grow organically with an equal combination of intent and acceptance.  Most of my paintings are a combination of these different approaches.  While I have painted many other subjects and use different mediums and approaches in my work, I have always painted trees. –Amanda Parry Oglesbee

For more information on Amanda Parry Oglesbee, visit her website at:  https://amandaoglesbee.com/

 

"Yadahta:wak Hihšönya:nö' (Father & Son - They Make Things)”

Peter & Mike Jones

Exhibit took place June 12th to July 24th 2021

Pottery, sculpture, and paintings by renowned artists Peter and Mike Jones. The work of both artists reflect their Native heritage and issues that have impacted the Hodínöhsö:ni:h “People of the Long House”.

Internationally renown potter and sculptor Peter Jones, whose work is “neo-traditional” a modern take on pre-colonization Iroquois pottery forms that had died out in the 1500’s. Peter studied under Hopi artist Otellie Loloma while attending the Institute of the American Indian Art in New Mexico. His work is in private and public collections world-wide, including the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian and Heard Museum. Mike Jones, who learned pottery from his father Peter, also paints and sculpts, taking inspiration from a diverse set of Native and Non-Native artists such as T.C. Cannon, Dan Namingha, Earl Bliss, M.C. Escher and Gustav Klimt among others. Mike’s work is in collections nationwide, including the Heard Museum, the Iroquois Indian Museum, and the Indian Arts and Crafts Board.

“This project is made possible with funds from the Decentralization Program, a regrant program of the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and administered by Tri-County Arts Council”

“A House for a Home”

This was a special exhibit at the Tri-County Arts Council on Monday, June 7th 6PM-8PM!

“A House for a Home” was an Art from the Heart project done by 30 Olean Middle School students who created over 60 wonderful ceramic ornaments in the shape of houses. These ceramic houses will be for sale to raise funds for a permanent home for Ugandan orphans. Cari Matejka, an Olean Teacher, started Literacy of Love to help destitute children and orphans in Uganda find hope and a future! She teamed up with fellow teacher Laura Hamed and Tara Dedrick, a recently retired teacher and ceramics instructor at TCAC to organize the project.


This exciting one evening event was open to the public and all were welcome to come and collect the handmade ceramic ornaments and support a worthy cause.
The houses are also for sale after the exhibition at: https://www.literacyoflove.com/the-project/ and also at the Tri-County Artisan Market located inside the Arts Council at 110 West State Street in Olean!

"Maestro Moods”

Watercolor & Mixed Media by Peg Bothner

Was on Display during April 16th to May 22nd 2021

Pottery, sculpture, and paintings by renowned artists Peter and Mike Jones. The work of both artists reflect their Native heritage and issues that have impacted the Hodínöhsö:ni:h “People of the Long House”.

Internationally renown potter and sculptor Peter Jones, whose work is “neo-traditional” a modern take on pre-colonization Iroquois pottery forms that had died out in the 1500’s. Peter studied under Hopi artist Otellie Loloma while attending the Institute of the American Indian Art in New Mexico. His work is in private and public collections world-wide, including the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian and Heard Museum. Mike Jones, who learned pottery from his father Peter, also paints and sculpts, taking inspiration from a diverse set of Native and Non-Native artists such as T.C. Cannon, Dan Namingha, Earl Bliss, M.C. Escher and Gustav Klimt among others. Mike’s work is in collections nationwide, including the Heard Museum, the Iroquois Indian Museum, and the Indian Arts and Crafts Board.

“This project is made possible with funds from the Decentralization Program, a regrant program of the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and administered by Tri-County Arts Council”